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Study: Workers say they are more effective working from home


New research from Nintex shows that remote work has been beneficial for many employees, and 67% of employees say that they have been working more efficiently.

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Working from home, once seen by many as a luxury, has now become a necessity for so many employees as a result of the ongoing health crisis brought by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

SEE: COVID-19 workplace policy (TechRepublic Premium)

But how are employees weathering this change? According to a newly released study on remote work by Nintex, a process management and automation firm, it concludes that US-based workers, with some caveats, are thriving despite these new challenges.

For the survey, titled “Nintex Workplace Study,” the company reached out to 1,000 full-time American workers at companies with a range of 501 to 50,000 employees about how they are enjoying and embracing remote work. 

The survey pool included employees across all ranks, from coordinators to C-suite executives, Nintex says. 

Among the results, 70% of those surveyed claimed that undergoing remote work amid the coronavirus threat was by-andin-large a mostly positive situation. “When asked to describe their better-than-expected experiences,” the study says, “respondents pointed to family time, no commute, fewer interruptions, and work-life balance.” 

This is in line with the idea that working from home is now widely seen as a plus, as TechRepublic has previously reported.

SEE: Working from home is now widely viewed as a positive (TechRepublic)

There are still obstacles when it comes to remote work depending onwhen in terms to different types of job levels. Individuals in senior- level positions, according to the report, have adapted more strongly to doing their jobs at home and have flourished as a result. By contrast, those in entry-level roles often reported that they felt overworked. And rRespondents with dependents stated they are working harder because of their situation, and many said they were looking forward to returning to the office.   

Still, 67% of the employees from the survey reported they’re getting their work done “more efficiently since transitioning to full-time remote” but also claimed they could benefit from “additional flexibility, better tech equipment, and easy-to-used automation software.” One respondent is quoted as saying “compensation for Wi-Fiwifi and more work materials that would have been provided in office” could be helpful, for instance, while others stated providing a more “flexible work hour routine” or “‘do not disturb’ time blocks” would make remote work run more smoothlysmoother.  

Among generational lines, Gen Z (born between 1997 and 2012, according to the Pew Research), said the most helpful thing for better remote productivity would be software that provides automation for tasks, while millennials (anyone born between 1981 and 1996) claimed better home-office hardware equipment was their main concerns (such as updated laptops and monitors). And for those belonging to Gen X (born between 1965 and 1980), a more flexible work schedule is a priority. Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964), considered a raise as the top priority when it came to being asked to work from home. 

SEE: Half of professionals believe working from home has negatively impacted their careers  (TechRepublic)

Workers, in general, were roughly split on the idea of one day returning to the office, but percent-wise, it leaned towards wanting companies to provide more flexibility. In particular, the study noted: “Employees are likely to prioritize companies that offer flexible work options aimed at improving the individual employee experience, in turn maximizing their productivity and engagement on the job. 

Other highlights of the study are that employees are “burnt out” but aren’t “taking the time off they need to regain their energy,” and that “the single most valuable resource employees want more of is time.” 

Nintex concludes that one of the major reasons employees seem to like remote work is “because, without a commute, employees have more time to spend with family and friends, and on hobbies, and personal health.” And yet, according to the study, employees in the post-remote world have all too often found themselves in “consecutive video meetings,” for instance, “which are compounded by inefficient processes.” Tasks, they maintain, “take up too much of their valuable time.”  

“Employees across every job role and generation are looking for workplaces that are flexible and offer automation tools that make work faster, easier, and more enjoyable,” said Nintex chief marketing and strategy officer Dustin Grosse, adding, “the single most valuable resource employees want more of is time.” 

Nintex concludes in the release that one of the major reasons employees seem to like remote work is “because, without a commute, employees have more time to spend with family and friends, and on hobbies and personal health.” And yet, according to the study, employees in the post-remote world have all too often found themselves in “consecutive video meetings,” for instance, “which are compounded by inefficient processes.” Tasks, they maintain, “take up too much of their valuable time.”  

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This post was written by and was first posted to TechRepublic



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